flowersshallgrowthatiseternity:

Pieter Bruegel the Elder, The Gloomy Day (1565)

flowersshallgrowthatiseternity:

Pieter Bruegel the Elder, The Gloomy Day (1565)

(via titians-ambition)

"The act of being personally misconstrued, informed to one’s face one is no more complex than a few words haphazardly strung together like blotchy undershirts on a clothesline — well, it can gall the most self-possessed of individuals."

Marisha Pessl, “Special Topics in Calamity Physics” (via thymoss)

(Source: lifeinpoetry, via thymoss)

jessicapauls:

Mr.Bhandari has had more character development than half the characters, it’s sad.

(via happyfionacoyneday)

artandcetera:

Human Error

Victoria Siemer, also know as Witchoria, is a graphic designer hailing from Brooklyn, New York. Human Error is a series of nostalgic polaroids that depict the broken heart as a computerized error that may or may not be restored in a few mouseclicks. 

(via meistens)

neekaisweird:

Happy July

choomathy:

this series was fun. I remember my tutor tried to get all “damn girl I love your work with feminism what a deep concept” and I was like nah I just like baths and … nipples

(via copper-flasks-and-paper-masks)

(Source: ruztcohle, via pianti)

"A trace of strangeness in this sense easily enters even the most intimate relationships. In the stage of first passion, erotic relations strongly reject any thought of generalization: the lovers think that there has never been a love like theirs; that nothing can be compared either to the person loved or to the feelings for that person. An estrangement - whether as cause or as consequence it is difficult to decide - usually comes at the moment when this feeling of uniqueness vanishes from the relationship. A certain skepticism in regard to its value, in itself and for them, attaches to the very thought that in their relation, after all, they carry out only a generally human destiny; that they experience an experience that has occurred a thousand times before; that, had they not met their particular partner, they would have found the same significance in another person."

— georg simmel, the stranger. (via isabelthespy)

(via isabelthespy)